Thursday, May 09, 2013

Fannie Mae Reports Pre-Tax Income of $8.1 Billion for First Quarter 2013

by Calculated Risk on 5/09/2013 10:02:00 AM

From Fannie Mae: Fannie Mae Reports Pre-Tax Income of $8.1 Billion for First Quarter 2013

Fannie Mae reported pre-tax income of $8.1 billion for the first quarter of 2013, compared with pre-tax income of $2.7 billion in the first quarter of 2012 and pre-tax income of $7.6 billion in the fourth quarter of 2012. Fannie Mae’s pre-tax income for the first quarter of 2013 was the largest quarterly pre-tax income in the company’s history. The improvement in the company’s results in the first quarter of 2013 compared with the first quarter of 2012 was due primarily to strong credit results driven by an increase in home prices, including higher average sales prices on Fannie Mae-owned properties, a decline in the number of delinquent loans, and the company’s resolution agreement with Bank of America. Including Fannie Mae’s release of the valuation allowance on its deferred tax assets, the company reported quarterly net income of $58.7 billion for the first quarter of 2013. Fannie Mae reported comprehensive income of $59.3 billion in the first quarter of 2013, compared with comprehensive income of $3.1 billion for the first quarter of 2012.
From Nick Timiraos at the WSJ: Fannie Mae to Send $59.4 Billion to U.S. Treasury
Fannie recognized $50.6 billion in tax benefits during the first quarter, in addition to pre-tax income of $8.1 billion during the period. ... The tax boost stemmed from reversing write-downs of its deferred-tax assets, which are unused tax credits and deductions that can offset future tax bills but which are worthless if a company isn't expected to turn a profit and have taxable income.

The mortgage-finance company began writing down the tax benefits in 2008 as rising mortgage defaults threatened to wipe out thin capital reserves. ... Fannie reclaimed the deferred-tax assets during the first quarter because the company concluded it is likely to be profitable for the foreseeable future.

Fannie's expected payment of $59.4 billion to the U.S. Treasury will bring to $95 billion the amount of dividends it has paid to the Treasury. It has received $116.1 billion in aid, leaving the net cost of its bailout at around $21.1 billion.
This bailout will probably be positive soon - and the U.S. still owns all the preferred shares!

On REO (Real Estate Owned), Fannie Mae reported that REO declined to 101,449 houses, down from 105,666 at the end of Q4 2012. This is the lowest level of REO since 2009.

From Fannie's SEC filing:
We recognized a benefit for credit losses of $957 million in the first quarter of 2013 compared with a provision for credit losses of $2.0 billion in the first quarter of 2012. This result was driven by an increase in home prices, including the sales prices of our REO properties in the first quarter of 2013, and lower single-family delinquency rates. Home prices increased in the first quarter of 2013, which decreases the likelihood that loans will default and reduces the amount of credit losses on loans that default. Sales prices on dispositions of our REO properties improved in the first quarter of 2013 as a result of strong demand compared with the prior year. We received net proceeds from our REO sales equal to 65% of the loans’ unpaid principal balance in the first quarter of 2013, compared with 56% in the first quarter of 2012. ...

The number of seriously delinquent loans declined 19% to approximately 528,000 as of March 31, 2013 from approximately 651,000 as of March 31, 2012 and the number of early stage delinquent loans declined 7% to approximately 392,000 as of March 31, 2013 from approximately 419,000 as of March 31, 2012. The reduction in the number of delinquent loans is due, in part, to our efforts since 2009 to improve our underwriting standards and the credit quality of our single-family guaranty book of business, which has resulted in a decrease in the number of loans becoming delinquent. A decline in the number of loans becoming delinquent or seriously delinquent reduces our total loss reserves and provision for credit losses.
So Fannie is taking smaller losses on foreclosed houses (65% of UPB because of rising prices), there are fewer seriously delinquent loans, and there are fewer early stage delinquencies.