Friday, January 09, 2015

Update on FHA Mortgage Insurance Premium (MIP) Reduction

by Bill McBride on 1/09/2015 01:32:00 PM

Jann Swanson at Mortgage News Daily Update on Mortgage Insurance Cut: FHA to Allow Case Number Cancellation

According to the executive order announced yesterday FHA will almost immediately cut .5 percent from the annual premium for the FHA backed loans with terms greater than 15yrs. For most FHA loans this will reduce the annual premium from 1.35 percent of the loan balance to .85 percent. Loans with balances above the loan limits in effect in most areas and with current MIP of 1.50 to 1.55 percent will see new premiums of 1.00 or 1.05 percent respectively. The upfront premium for all loans will remain unchanged at 1.75 percent.

Borrowers with FHA Case Numbers issued on or after January 26 will be eligible for the new premium rates. However, today's letter has good news for borrowers already in process of getting their FHA loan. Lenders will temporarily be allowed to cancel Case Numbers issued before that date.
Key points:
1) Cut applies to loan greater than 15 years (15 year loan are already at lower levels).

2) Borrowers with FHA-insured loans can refinance and obtain the lower annual MIP, as long as the original endorsement was after May 31, 2009 (Older loans have a lower annual MIP. The annual MIP was increased from 0.55% to 0.90% in October 2010, to 1.15% in April 2011, to 1.25% in April 2012, and to 1.35% in April 2013 for borrowers with less than 5% down.)  Note: HUD told me yesterday that they expect 100,000 to 200,000 FHA-insured borrowers to refinance in the next year.

3) Lenders can cancel loans in process so borrowers can obtain lower annual MIP. As Swanson notes, there will probably be a surge in loans starting January 26th (all the canceled loans, and an increase in refinance activity).

Note: Borrowers with FHA-insured loans that are thinking of refinancing should check other alternatives (if the value of the home has increased - or other changes - maybe the borrower can get a lower rate with a different program).