Tuesday, November 01, 2011

Construction Spending increased slightly in September

by Bill McBride on 11/01/2011 11:45:00 AM

Catching up ... this morning from the Census Bureau reported that overall construction spending increased in September:

The U.S. Census Bureau of the Department of Commerce announced today that construction spending during September 2011 was estimated at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $787.2 billion, 0.2 percent (±1.8%)* above the revised August estimate of $786.0 billion. The September figure is 1.3 percent (±1.9%)* below the September 2010 estimate of $797.3 billion.
Private construction spending increased in September:
Spending on private construction was at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $501.8 billion, 0.6 percent (±1.1%)* above the revised August estimate of $499.0 billion. Residential construction was at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $228.3 billion in September, 0.9 percent (±1.3%)* above the revised August estimate of $226.3 billion.
Private Construction Spending Click on graph for larger image.

This graph shows private residential and nonresidential construction spending, and public spending, since 1993. Note: nominal dollars, not inflation adjusted.

Private residential spending is 66% below the peak in early 2006, and non-residential spending is 34% below the peak in January 2008.

Public construction spending is now 12% below the peak in March 2009.

Private Construction SpendingThe second graph shows the year-over-year change in construction spending.

On a year-over-year basis, both private residential and non-residential construction spending have turned positive, but public spending is now falling on a year-over-year basis as the stimulus spending ends. The year-over-year improvements in private non-residential are mostly due to energy spending (power and electric).

Earlier:
ISM Manufacturing index indicates slower expansion in October